Nutrition Assessment Part One: Cronometer & Summary Report

Nutrition Assessment Part One: Cronometer & Summary Report

Running Head: RUA Part One 1

RUA Part One 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nutrition Assessment Part One: Cronometer & Summary Report

Cory Jarosch, Estefani Vargas, Sandra Amezquita

Chamberlain University

NR 228: Nutrition Health & Wellness

Dr. Jin Kim

February 1, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cronometer Summary of Nutrient Report and Food Intake Day 1

 

Excess Nutrients

Sodium

Sodium (146%)Grilled Cheese sandwich, Steamed Green Beans

 

Deficit Nutrients

Water, Carbs, Fiber, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Omega-6, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Potassium, and Zinc

Water (2%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Carbs (49%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Steamed Green Beans, Watermelon Craisins
Fiber (26%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Steamed Green Beans, Watermelon Craisins
Vitamin B2 (39%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Vitamin B3 (33%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Vitamin B5 (15%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Vitamin B6 (12%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Folate (49%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Vitamin C (0%)None
Vitamin D (21%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Vitamin E (15%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Vitamin K (28%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Omega-6 (34%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Copper (17%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Iron (22%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Magnesium (18%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Manganese (21%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Potassium (5%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Zinc (29%)Grilled Cheese Sandwich

 

Cronometer Summary of Nutrient Report and Food Intake Day 2

 

 

Excess Nutrients

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 (113%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain

 

Deficit Nutrients

Water, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Calcium, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Potassium, Fiber, Omega-3, Omega-6, Protein

Water (14%)Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened, Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain
Vitamin B1 (49%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Vitamin B2 (47%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Vitamin B5 (23%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Vitamin B6 (44%)Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened, Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain
Folate (32%)Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened, Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain
Vitamin A (24%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Dandy, Celery Sticks, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Vitamin C (42%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Dandy, Celery Sticks, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Vitamin D (7%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain
Vitamin E (10%)Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened, Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain
Vitamin K (8%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Calcium (27%)Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened, Dandy, Celery Sticks, Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain
Copper (36%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Iron (32%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Dandy, Celery Sticks, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Magnesium (22%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Manganese (20%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Phosphorus (46%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Potassium (16%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Fiber (38%)Bob Evans, Broccoli, Steamed, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened, Dandy, Celery Sticks, Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain
Omega-3 (10%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened

 

Omega-6 (10%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened
Protein (34%)Cheeseburger on a Bun, Single Patty, Plain, Bob Evans, Broccoli, Steamed, Dandy, Celery Sticks, Applesauce, Canned, Sweetened

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cronometer Summary of Nutrient Report and Food Intake Day 3

 

 

Excess Nutrients

Vitamin A and B12

Vitamin A (148%)Carrots, tossed salad, apple, cheeseburger

 

Vitamin B12 (113%)Cheeseburger

 

 

Deficit Nutrients

Energy, water, carbs, fiber, net carbs, fat, omega-3, omega-6, B2, B5, folate, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium

Energy (37%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
Water (15%)Apple, salad, cheeseburger, carrots
Carbs (39%)Apple, cheeseburger, salad, carrots
Fiber (24%)Apple, cheeseburger, salad, carrots
Net Carbs (41%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
Fat (33%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
Omega-3 (16%)Cheeseburger, salad, apple, carrots
Omega-6 (10%)Cheeseburger, apple, carrots
B2 (49%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
B5 (26%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
Folate (43%)Cheeseburger, salad, apple, carrots
Vitamin C (43%)Apple, salad, cheeseburger, carrots
Vitamin D (7%)Cheeseburger
Vitamin E (11%)Apple, cheeseburger, salad
Vitamin K (40%)Salad, apple, cheeseburger, carrots
Calcium (24%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
Copper (35%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots

 

Iron (31%)Cheeseburger, salad, apple, carrots
Magnesium (27%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
Manganese (25%)Cheeseburger, salad, apple, carrots
Phosphorus (49%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots
Potassium (21%)Cheeseburger, apple, salad, carrots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group Summary

The menu analysis is for a five-year-old boy, 3’7 in height, and 41 pounds. The results from the Cronometer indicate there is more-so extreme deficiency than excess of nutrients during the three days recorded; 13, 21, and 30. The excess nutrients counted were any that were over 100 percent and the deficient nutrients counted as anything under 50 percent, not including amino acids.

The Cronometer results show that the most common nutrients in excess are sodium with about 146%, vitamin B12 with 113%, and vitamin A with 148%. Sodium is an essential mineral in the body that aids in balancing the osmotic pressure of the body cell, nerve, and muscle coordination. However, excess sodium in the body raises blood pressure, and other conditions such as heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure (Cox, 2013). Excess vitamin B12 is usually removed through urination, however, some more severe causes of too much B12 in the body can be liver disease. Vitamin B12 is usually stored in the liver for over a year (Husney, 2021). Lastly, too much vitamin A over long periods of time can lead to nausea, lightheadedness, vomiting, or headache. Being that this child is so young, vitamin A supplements are not necessary unless prescribed, but too much can lead to death in rare cases (Dewar, 2019).

Some of the nutrients deficient from the Cronometer, results include energy, water, Carbs, Fiber, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Omega-6, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Potassium, and Zinc. Water is an essential component of the blood and maintaining body temperature. Carbs are the main source of energy helpful for the normal functioning of the body. Fiber helps in the digestion process and reduces the risk of chronic diseases (Gunnars, 2018). Vitamins are essential nutrients in enhancing the body fighting against infections. Omega-6 improves brain functioning, while metal minerals play a significant role in bone development and blood functionality. Therefore, it is important to ensure that all these nutrients are available in the meals to better the body’s overall function.

Group Conclusion

The five-year-old boy’s lunch menu is more deficient in nutrients and minerals than it is excess. Thus, he should maintain sodium, vitamin B12, and vitamin A below 100% per meal to avoid health issues down the road. Likewise, nutrients such as water, carbs, and fiber are essential in the body’s hydration, digestion, and energy, considering he is young and active. Vitamins are also crucial components in the meals to maintain a strong health profile. Since the boy is at his growing stages, minerals are a good diet constituent to building strong bones, enhance nerve coordination, brain functioning, and blood composition. All these nutrients and minerals in excess should be maintained above 50% per meal. Ultimately, it is important to hold all the components of a well-planned diet at optimum levels to enhance the boy’s healthy growth and development. The lack of nutrients concerns should be taken to the schools’ board to try to improve the foods being fed to these students.

This project has made us realize school menus may seem healthier just because you see fruits and vegetables on the list, however the lack of nutrients for the pediatric population at this school is disturbing. If schools were to take a better approach to serving foods with better nutrients to these young kids, maybe the disease rate of certain problems in the US would go down in the future.

 

References

Cox, L. (2013, May 30). Why is too much salt bad for you? Retrieved from

https://www.livescience.com/36256-salt-bad-health.html#:~:text=Excess%20

Dewar, G. (n.d.). Vitamin A supplements: Is your kid getting too much vitamin a? Retrieved

February 03, 2021, from https://www.parentingscience.com/vitamin-A-supplements.html

Gunnars, K. (2018, May 23). Why is fiber good for you? The crunchy truth. Retrieved

From https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/why-is-fiber-good-for-you

Husney, A. (2019, April 18). Health library. Retrieved February 03, 2021, from

 
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